17th Century, Culture, Economics, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Native Americans

Dakota & Ojibwe Treaty 1679

Source: Google Images

Daniel Greysolon Dulhut

Tensions mount between the Dakota and the Ojibwe newcomers. At a meeting arranged by Daniel du Luth, a European trader interested in keeping the peace, they strike a bargain. The Dakota agree to let the Ojibwe hunt in their territory, and the Ojibwe will let traders cross Lake Superior to trade with the Dakota.*

Lord, thanks for being a good dad! Thanks that You know how to deal with the pettiness of children…and adults. I want to acknowledge the tensions that have risen in my own heart through the judgments of others, and the property that You have entrusted them with. I am just like du Luth, the Dakota, and the Ojibwe!

Will you forgive the fears of these groups towards one another? Will You forgive any envy of these groups? Will You release both victim and victimizer from the judgements of this event? Will You release us in the present from any heritage of bitterness or self-righteousness as it pertains to trade and commerce on Lake Superior? May You bless all, like du Luth, who seek to establish chesed (right relationship) rather than conflict?

*Note – PrayThroughHistory uses the timeline located for several years at the Minnesota Historical Society Web site, at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm .  Currently the timeline seems to be unavailable. I am hopeful that it will be back up in the future, as it was a valuable, user-friendly tool for anyone wishing to explore Minnesota history.

 

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18 thoughts on “Dakota & Ojibwe Treaty 1679

  1. In my first experience of what you are sharing, I am much impressed with the idea that prayer and its spirit power are effectual as streams that are not dependent upon the frameworks of time and space. In the same way, the blood from the cross may touch us, today, it may be directed to yesterday as well as to tomorrow. Thanks for sharing; be encouraged!

      • Be encouraged! Understanding we can not manipulate GOD through prayer, or change the events of the past, the believer’s focus can be to “see with 20/20 hindsight,” and to be alert and vigilant for things promised and yet to come. We may discover heretofore hidden information, discern and recognize the active presence of GOD, witness sacred operations performed by the Spirit, and begin to more correctly apply the lessons and spirit-truth demonstrated.

    • A huge motive to me is that our first offense in sin, is to G-D! All through the OT, He calls and says, “If my people would humble themselves…”. I just want to be the kid that says, “Yeah Dad, we broke the cookie jar!”

  2. I think it is wonderful and inspiring that you are reaching back in history and asking God to forgive us our sins, and to restore us. History is really His story.

    Thank you for stopping by my blog. Please keep up the good work.

  3. Khanh Nguyen says:

    Wow your whole pray through history journey is sooo powerful! I teach a class on Race and Ethnicity and talk about confession for past (not just present) corporate (not just individual) sin. Many people when discussion/debating issues of racism/genocide & broken treaties really get upset when we bring up the past sins of our nation. How do you think we can show people the importance of what you are doing when people just want to say “the past is in the past – get over it and move on” (Particularly for people in the church)

    By the way can I point my students to your site?

  4. The way you are praying through history is a profound and needed project. In March I’ll publish a book about my unknown family history — I never learned about it until I was 70. In this process I learn about here and there, then and now and find that past and present blend together. We surely need to ask God’s forgiveness for past transgressions, as well as those in the present. Thank you for stopping by my blogs, I am also learning from yours.

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