19th Century, education, Exploration, government, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Native Americans, State Government

Nicollet Maps of Upper Mississippi River 1843

220px-Joseph_Nicollet_001

French astronomer Joseph Nicollet’s accurate maps of the upper Mississippi region, made over the course of several visits to Fort Snelling, are published by the U.S. Senate in 1843.*

Thanks for the blessing of accurate maps. Thanks that You give us a real assessment of the situations of our lives. Thank you that good maps help define land uses and indirectly, land disputes!

As I ponder Messr. Nicollet’s involvement in the life of this state, I quickly come to the question, “Why is an astronomer mapping terra firma so far from home?” Although I know so little about astronomy, I can easily imagine that he was trained to map the vastness of space. Perhaps working on such a small scale was a new challenge to him, or no challenge at all. His motives in this work are unknown to me, but would be an interesting campfire story.

However, I am practicing thinking about history as the Eternal Now. This is where Your Spirit leads me. I thank You that You led this man outside his discipline. I thank You that he was taken far beyond his home into the wilderness of North America. I thank You that he shared his gift, even if it was second place to astronomy! Will You bless us as his progeny to embrace the moments in life we are taken out of our expertise, and into the woods?

*www.dipity.com/Minnesota/History/Minnesota-History/

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19th Century, education, Exploration, Geology, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Native Americans, Natural Science

Nicollet and Fremont visit Pipestone quarries 1838

Nicollet

Nicollet

Fremont

Fremont

While on expedition, Nicollet and John Fremont camp at the Pipestone quarries (in what is now Pipestone National Monument in Pipestone County) and engrave their initials near the Winnewissa Falls, leaving a lasting record of their presence there.*

God, since when did graffiti become history? It seems we are unaware of our actions today on future generations. Yet historians and achaeologists surely appreciate these moments of civil disobedience. What is literally scrawled on the walls of the present gives us a much more colorful picture of what happened in the past. Thanks for graffiti artists!

More specifically, thank You for moving Nicollet and Fremont to explore and physically record their attendance to Your pipestone quarry. All on earth belongs to You, but You move some of us to wonder, to travel, to seek out the wonders You have made. It is only my opinion, but I sense a smile on Your eternal face when our curiosity moves us outward, beyond, and into the the unknown!

Thanks for the blessings of pipestone and its amazing uses. Its physical properties made it a natural treasure for past and present minnesotans. Will You bless the quarries at Pipestone! May we continually discover incredible uses for this resource, and use it wisely. Will You free the quarries from the bitter judgments between all relevant parties over its use/misuse?

*Note – PrayThroughHistory uses the timeline located for several years at the Minnesota Historical Society Web site, at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm .  The current URL is www.dipity.com/Minnesota/History/Minnesota-History/ and only works if typed, not pasted, in browser. It is worth the effort!

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