Agriculture, Energy, Uncategorized

Energy Crisis 1872

unknown

Epizootic fever strikes horses throughout the Midwest. The three-month sickness plunges horse-powered Minnesota into its first energy crisis.*

I need to let this one simmer for a bit; “the three-month sickness plunges horse-powered Minnesota into its first energy crisis.” It’s hard to relate to this not-so-distance past when “horse-power” really meant the labor of a workhorse. I believe it was as late as W. W. II when the majority of Minnesotans still lived on farms, and felt this connection to living “horse-power. (I still need to let this steep.)

There’s something good about the connection between human and horse. Your draft animal as a precious commodity, means of production, and even friend?! A car with a face? A tractor with a face? A companion who saw the same sights, and explored the same paths as its master?

Below is some documentation of the breadth and width of this epizootic fever.
“Beginning in Toronto, Canada, in the late summer of 1872, in only three days the disease hit nearly all the livery stables and the horses used to pull streetcars in that city. By mid-October, horses in all of Canada, Michigan and the New England states were infected. By the beginning of November the disease had spread to Illinois, Ohio and South Carolina. By the end of the month, Florida and Louisiana reported cases.” http://www.heritagebarns.com/the-great-epizootic-of-1872/#.V9s-fmPSfVo

Holy Spirit, today I remember the I remember this equine flu epidemic of 1872. I relationship between the suffering of animals and the people of this state. I acknowledge the contribution of veterinarians to the well-being of these individual animals, and indirectly to our state.

Will You forgive us any judgments made against Your goodness or holiness because of the epizootic fever then? You care about each detail of our lives, and of each creature in Your world. We give You thanks for these horses past, and sincerely thank You for Minnesota’s present stock. We ask Your blessings on each colt, filly, mare, stallion, bronco, foal, and gelding that will walk the North Star state in perpetuity!

The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

Standard
Civics, History, Intercession, Uncategorized

Austin Becomes Governor

candidate37119

Jan 9, 1870 to Jan 7, 1874
Horace Austin takes office as the state’s sixth governor. A reputation for clearheaded objectivity and disdain for contentious party politics enhanced the appeal of Judge Horace Austin as a gubernatorial candidate in 1869. Minnesota’s sixth governor was determined to bring legislative power to bear against the railroad barons. His advocacy of strictly regulated passenger and freight rates and his opposition to the wholesale allocation of state lands to railroad development earned him a second term. But he was unable to resolve completely the problems inherent in controlling a booming transportation industry and curbing the excesses of its owners.*

Lord, thanks that You are our shield! To my knowledge, our people have suffered much historically through the over-reaching hands of the railroad. (Especially the farmers!) Thank you for providing Governor Austin that would stand up to these barons; even if only partially successful. Furthermore, thank You for his example of nonpartisanism, and the bridge-building he achieved with this more nuanced approach to solving problems for Minnesotans!

Will You forgive the judgements between Minnesotans, the railroad barons, the U. S. Government, and our state government? We know that You have told us in Lev. 19:35,36 to use “honest scales and honest weights”. Because You have forgiven us our debts, we forgive the numerous injustices perpetuated by all railroads, their employees, their owners, financiers, and any other party unnamed that have been bound in this unforgiveness.

Will You return us to a right relationship? Will You restore the lands that have been cursed through the contention between First Nations, citizens of the state, and the railroad companies? May these same rails become pathways of blessing!

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

Standard
History, Minnesota, Uncategorized

Nininger City Fails 1869

unknown-2

The Panic of 1857 and the decision of the steamboats to use Hastings instead of Nininger as a river port doom Nininger City, the dream town of Ignatius Donnelly.

Nininger declines steadily after the financial panic of 1857 that causes banks across the country to call in loans. Donnelly tries to put a positive spin on the eastern bank failures by issuing a handbill entitled “Cure for the Panic. Emigrate to Minnesota! Where no Banks exist.”

People move away anyway. By the 8th U.S. census in 1860, only 469 remain. Buildings disappear and by 1869 no other buildings remain besides Ignatius Donnelly’s house. The town eventually disappears from the map.*

Have mercy on us! We make our dreams into idols, and are heartbroken and bitter when they fail us! Thank you for Donnelly and bless Your heart within his dreams! There is much good in wanting to provide a shelter for others in volatile times. How bitter for him it must have been to see Hastings thrive?!

Lord, will You forgive any judgments that Donnelly had against Hastings, and vice versa? Will you make us free in the present from this bitter root? Will You bless the river and the lands involved? Will You preserve Nininger and Hastings in the season of flooding? Will You cause us to bless the town next door as much as our own?

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

Standard
History, Native Americans, Uncategorized

Sisseton Wahpeton Reservations Established Feb 19, 1867

Unknown-2

The Sisseton (or Lake Traverse) Reservation in northeastern South Dakota and the Devil’s Lake Reservation in central North Dakota are established for the Sisseton and Wahpeton bands, originally from Minnesota. These two bands had argued for the restoration of their treaty rights on the grounds that they had not fully participated in the war of 1862.*

Lord Jesus, I ask that You enter this negotiation of February 19 so long ago. Will You bring Your justice into this situation? Will You free the Minnesotan and tribal members from the sins of their generations? Will You bring a new peace between Sisseton Wahpeton and our State?

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

 

Standard
education, History, Uncategorized

Emerson Speaks 1867

Unknown-1

Ralph Waldo Emerson braves sub-zero weather in an open sleigh to lecture in Winona. The poet and essayist–known to many as “the wisest American”–gives four other speeches in Minnesota before returning to Massachusetts.
“Mr. Emerson leaves to the world no system of philosophy, no orderly presentation of new or great truths; but he has done a a great and usually salutary work by stimulating the thought of two generations and by helping courageously to clear away the intellectual rubbish which the centuries had gathered. . . He has done the needed work of the iconoclast in so kindly and decorous a way as to hurt as little as possible the enduring good.” Minneapolis Tribune April 28, 1882 as cited by Hubert H. Hoeltje in “Emerson in Minnesota”
http://collections.mnhs.org/MNHistoryMagazine/articles/11/v11i02p145-159.pdf
Lord, I have not experienced much of Emerson’s wisdom, but I ask that You bless him, his generations, dwellings, and property in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ! May we follow in his footsteps to do the intellectual work You have for us in this life. May we bless the future of Minnesota with “enduring good”!

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

 

Standard
Immigration, Intercession, Uncategorized

Attracting Settlers 1867

Unknown

People mean progress and prosperity to the new state. Minnesota establishes a board of immigration to attract settlers. Hans Mattson, secretary of the board, makes several trips to Sweden to recruit immigrants.

Mattson had been a founder of Goodhue County’s Vasa colony in the 1850s. Now he encourages newly-immigrated Swedes to farm mainly in the central part of the state, with great successes in Wright, Meeker, and Kandiyohi counties.*

Thanks for the establishment of a board of immigration! Thank You for Hans Mattson and his work to advertise Minnesota. Thank You that this state could be a shelter for many Europeans, but in this case, especially Swedish immigrants.
May any bitter root judgments between Wright, Meeker, Kandiyohi, Mattson, Minnesota, or Sweden be broken in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ! Will You soothe the burning frustrations between citizens of Minnesota and illegal immigrants past? Will You show our nation how to resolve the problems of having a population of perhaps 20 million non-citizens in the present? Will You forgive our sins against You and our fellow human beings through this issue into the future?

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

Standard
Agriculture, History, Jesus, Uncategorized

Kelley on the Grange 1867

Unknown-1

Elk River homesteader Oliver H. Kelley, claiming to be “as full of public spirit as a dog is full of fleas,” leads the founding of the Patrons of Husbandry, or Grange. The organization, which includes women as equal members, sweeps across rural America, promoting scientific agriculture and enriching the social and cultural life of farm families.*

What was Mr. Kelley like as a human, Jesus? What desires did You put into his nature for his fellow farmers?
“Encourage them to read and think; to plant fruits and flowers,—beautify their homes; elevate them; make them progressive,” he wrote in a letter to a friend. “I long to see the great army of producers in our country, turn their eyes up from their work; stir up those brains, now mere machines … set them to think,—let them feel that they are human beings, the strength of the nation, their labor honorable, and farming the highest calling on earth.” http://www.mnopedia.org/person/kelley-oliver-hudson-1826-1913

His zeal reminds me of the heart of the Benedictines, whom are renowned for “ora et labora”; prayer and work. Dear Father, how we need that balance between heart and head! Kelley, sort of, reminds me of those with a prophetic calling who operate in the spirit of encouragement. http://www.religious-vocation.com/differences_religious_orders.html

Lord, make more like Kelley, who want to lift up humanity! Lord, may those of us who have this call remain humble, and not cross over in judgment of our neighbor! Will You grow the Grange, and dignify our labor today?

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

 

Standard