19th Century, Culture, education, Faith, government, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Native Americans, State Government

Bishop Whipple 1859  

Rev. Henry Whipple

Rev. Henry Whipple

Episcopal bishop Henry Whipple comes to Minnesota to “civilize” the Indians, but he also protests their mistreatment by the government.

When more than 300 Dakota are sentenced to death after the war of 1862, Whipple convinces President Lincoln to cut the number to 38.*

Great Holy Spirit, thank you for Bishop Whipple and his heart to know and minister to Indians. There are so many trigger points between Native Americans and our society that seem apparent to us now: ethnocentrism, casinos, property rights, and hunting rights to name a few. Perhaps these same flash points may not have been so obvious then?

For example, the Bishop wants to “civilize” the Indians. Only You know what this meant to Whipple. He could have meant to Anglicize the Indians by teaching them about his culture, and underscoring the importance of a written language and education. He could have meant that we are civilized when we meet Jesus, and cease our rebellion against Him, ourselves, and others. He could have meant to turn them into good Anglo-American citizens.

Whatever his motive Lord, I simply am aware of these judgments and counter-judgments that cloud the relationship between Your Native peoples and the rest of Minnesotas’ inhabitants. Will You forgive ALL Minnesotans’ our judgments? Will You hack any bitter roots that were planted by Henry Whipple, the Episcopal church, or other believers in 1859? Will You create a new relationship between Dakota and Your bride, the Church?

Thank you for the mercy that was extended to the Dakotas by President Lincoln due to Whipple’s intervention. He stuck his neck out to save Native necks!  May we continue to honor the lives You have given us, and even love the lives of those who oppose us! We are so far from Your tolerance and forebearance! We so easily forget that we once were rebels and enemies of Your kingdom of kindness, but You loved us while we were still sinners. May we imitate Your mercy and justice in the state of Minnesota! May You cause us and uphold us to be just! Will You “civilize” our hearts, and intervene for us in our deepest sorrows?

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out!

 

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19th Century, Business, Faith, farming, History, Industry, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota

King Wheat 1859  

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Minnesota’s first shipment of spring wheat is warmly received in Chicago–marking the start of an agricultural export that will become King in coming years. Production grows wildly as railroads connect farms to inland markets.

“Minnesota or that part of it known as Cottage Grove has gone to wheat. Men work in wheat all day when it does not rain, lounge round talking about wheat when it is wet, dream about wheat at night, and I fear go to meeting Sabbath Day to think about wheat.”
-Rev. George Biscoe, in a letter to his sister, August 21, 1862.*

Jesus, thank you for the blessing spring wheat has been to our state! Imagine how miraculous it felt to find a strain of grain that liked northern climes and short summers? Thank You for their generous yields, and the kind and rich soil that produced them! Thank you for ability of farmers, past and present, to focus on the work You have given them. Will You continue to bless the farmer of Minnesota, and everyone who works to bring our food to market?

Will You forgive the judgments the farmers of MInnesota have made against You? Will You forgive our grumblings about the weather, the length of the seasons, and any other rash words we have spoken against You? Will You forgive the judgments made between farmer and city-folk? Will You forgive us when we allow our passions to overtake us; even something as innocent as a desire for better grain?

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out!

 

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