20th Century, Christian, Civics, History, Minnesota, State Government

Governor Johnson Dies in Office

1909-09-21postcardGovJohnsonFuneralTrainRochesterMN

Sep 21, 1909
John A. Johnson was the state’s first governor to die in office, following surgery.*

My first question to You is; “Why do we exalt our political leaders?” Does a governor’s death hold more weight and import than one his constituents? Perhaps our Johnson’s death connotes the identification Minnesotans had with him; he was one of us.

Lord, thank You that Minnesotans did indeed relate with Governor Johnson! Thanks for the gift of empathy one feels for a fellow countryman. Thank You that we were created with a longing and value of our sense of place. Our geography imprints on our soul whether: city streets, a warehouse, open roads, or open fields.

We seem to own what our eyes often take in. A street we frequent becomes our ‘stomping grounds’. A forest we hunt we know “like the back of our hand”. May our leaders continue Johnson’s legacy of being “one of us”.

Good Governor of All, will You remember us when we lose a head of state, or maybe even a hero? Will You help us deal with losing a key leader or mentor in our lives? Will You honor the memory of Governor Johnson? Will You keep us from the extremes of guilt through creating a cult of personality around politicians, or neglecting to groom and constantly call forth the headship of the next generation?

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org, is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

Standard
19th Century, Business, Civics, Culture, education, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota

Black Newspaper Begins Publishing

unknown

Jun 6, 1885
Saint Paul’s Western Appeal newspaper becomes a voice against discrimination and proscriptive legislation and an important advertising medium for black businessmen.

Editor and owner John Q. Adams leads Saint Paul’s growing black community in its struggle for equality through the 1880s and ’90s. “No wrongs are ever righted,” he writes, “except by protest.”*

 

I thank you for the life and discipline of John Q. Adams. I thank you for giving him the desire to write and convey the ideas in his heart that brought a new awareness and significance to black Minnesotans. I thank you that he viewed himself as a man made in Your image and worthy of respect!
O Father, will you forgive the city of St. Paul, and the State of Minnesota, its judgments of John Q. Adams, “The Western Appeal”, black Minnesotans, and black Republicans? Will you forgive any counter judgments by him, his paper, or the black community of St. Paul, and the State of Minnesota? We often fear other cultures and sub-cultures because we are afraid to know them and experience the vulnerability of allowing ourselves to be known! Christ have mercy on this fear! Past, present, and future! What blessings we have not received here, specifically for this geographic region known as Minnesota, because we have not honored the Christ within our brothers and sisters!
Today, because of Your grace and truth, I ask: “Will You bless the generations of John Q. Adams? Will you bless the black community of St. Paul? Will you bless all African-Americans in this state? Will You reverse the curses of the Enemy on this State of Minnesota? Bring out those who will write the stories of this generation of black Minnesotans! Bring out those who will write in Your image of grace and truth! May we learn to record OUR history as those who have been betrayed, have betrayed others and ourselves, and most importantly, have betrayed You! May we remember how we have received mercy, have extended mercy to others and to ourselves, and received a perpetual inheritance of mercy from You!
Lord, because John Q. Adams was an author, I also want to pray a blessing specifically on his words, and their impact to all Minnesotans. May they be rediscovered and be a source of continual blessing to this state, and especially inspire African-American writers and publishers! Amen.

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

**See an actual copy of the Western Appeal? http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016811/

Standard
19th Century, Agriculture, Business, History, Industry, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota

Minneapolis Nation’s Flour Milling Capital 1880

300px-west_side_milling_district-minneapolis-c1905

Minnesota wheat and the power of St. Anthony Falls make Minneapolis the nation’s capital of flour milling.

A year later, Pillsbury’s new A Mill is the largest flour mill in the world.*

My first thought is, ”How do I pray for a flour mill, and why is it important?” Show me why Lord. Possible reasons:
1. The Washburn mill exploded, allowing Pillsbury a chance to take the lead. (It is difficult to pray for this event without being mindful of the pain of the explosion.) So, do I pray about the effects of professional pride and jealousy?
2. It could be a simple acknowledgement of a real accomplishment; an amazingly quick rebuild! Simply view it as a story of hope?
3. The aftermath of the event on our flour industry?

Jesus, You know our inmost thoughts, and yet you love us. Lord, Washburn and Pillsbury were competitors in the milling business. There’s nothing wrong with competition between these companies, or any other for that matter. However, if there were underhanded or bitter motives between them, will You release us from the burden of their jealousy, and or pride? Will You cleanse St. Anthony Falls from any guilt brought
on by any unethical competition?

Assuming everything was on the up and up, and the Washburn mills explosion was purely accidental, will You also cleanse us from the bitterness and sense of loss of that incident? Will You cleanse us of the spirit of blame? Will You heal this rift between companies then, and show our present-day business culture how to compete without
hating their rivals? I thank you today for blessings of outstanding Minnesota companies in the grain and milling business: General Mills and Cargill to name a few!

Thank You for leaders who face major setbacks, and rebuild something amazing; brick by brick. Will You forgive our judgments of business leaders in milling, as well as their peers in all major industries here? The average person knows nothing of the intensity, expectation of perfection, risk, and sheer loneliness of being on top. Will You inform our hearts’, minds’, and creativity in the context of leadership?

Will You show us new ways of doing business in Minnesota that honor You and the creation we are stewards of, and help us redeem the business culture of the world? May our progeny say with Isaiah,
“Because the Sovereign LORD helps me, I will not be disgraced. Therefore have I set my face like flint, and I know I will not be put to shame.” Isaiah 50:7
http://biblehub.com/isaiah/50-7.htm

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out! Images are from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl; again, an amazing resource!

Standard
19th Century, Culture, government, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Native Americans, State Government, war

U.S.-Dakota War, First Strike on New Ulm Aug 19, 1862

hqdefault

On hearing about the Dakota “uprising,” the men of New Ulm quickly go about erecting barricades in the center of town. About 100 Dakota soldiers attack New Ulm at 3:00 p.m. After almost two hours of fierce fighting, the Dakota break off the attack due to torrential rains. Word of the attacks reaches St. Paul. Governor Alexander Ramsey commissions Henry Sibley to lead the response against the Dakota. Sibley gathers his forces, mostly untrained civilians, and heads up the valley in pursuit of the Dakota.*

Jesus, I recognize the root separations that started this war. Over all, the prime motive for war seems to be broken trust. Often in human history, when the agreements of leaders fail, the innocents of their tribe, nation, or state bear the bloodguilt. Their leaders began the cycle of murder with their words, thoughts and actions. Yet, the kind, the unknowing, the innocent pay for their heart-murder!

Lord, will forgive us this offense against You! Forgive how good people on both sides of this issue were emotionally whipped up into an unnecessary frenzy that resulted in sickening cruelties! May town of New Ulm forgive the aggression of the estimated 100 Dakota soldiers. May the Dakota forgive the response of New Ulm and Henry Sibley.

Jesus, I invite You into this attack to remind all of true, self-sacrificing justice. Will You give revelation from this date of August 19, 1862 forward to all the participants, witnesses, and ancestors of the battle, their generations, and their property? We still fail to trust each other. We still do battle when something of ours is threatened. We blindly follow the emotional responses of our leaders with out properly testing their validity! We hate our fellow human beings, and are far from Your forbearing Spirit! Heal us, give us faith in each other, and heal this battle-scarred land!

*P.T.H. cites timeline formerly at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm
The Minnesota Historical Society Web site, http://www.mnhs.org , is fantastic! Check it out!

 

 

Standard