19th Century, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Politics, State Government

Minnesota Territory Established Mar 3, 1849

images-9

Minnesota becomes an organized territory, an important step on the way to becoming a state. Minnesota Territory stretches west to the Missouri River in what will become North and South Dakota.*

The name “Minnesota”comes from the Dakota word for “clear blue water.” Owing to its large number of lakes, the state is informally known as the “Land of 10,000 Lakes.” Its official motto is L’Étoile du Nord (French: Star of the North). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minnesota

Thanks that our ancestors decided to establish this Minnesota territory. There is power in naming or renaming. You renamed the people of Israel and Judah through the prophet Hosea saying, “So let your brothers be called “My People” and your sisters be called “Shown Mercy.” Hosea 2:1 Formerly, they had been called Lo-Ruhamah meaning “No Mercy” and Lo-Ammi meaning “Not My People.” Lord, will You rename us throughout Minnesota territory from March 3, 1849 forward?

*Note – PrayThroughHistory uses the timeline located for several years at the Minnesota Historical Society Web site, at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm .

Advertisements
Standard
19th Century, Emigration, farming, History, Immigration, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Native Americans

Settlement in Minnesota 1849 to 1860

images-8

The number of non-Indian people in Minnesota jumps from 3,814 in 1849 to 172,072 in 1860, a 4,500 percent increase! The newcomers break sod, start businesses, plot towns, look for jobs, and dream of getting rich.

Pent-up demand for good agricultural land is the primary reason. Iowa and Wisconsin had been heavily settled and had both passed from territorial to statehood status by 1848. It had been dangerous and illegal to settle on land in most of Minnesota before treaties with the Dakota and the Ojibwe were signed. But after several treaties were ratified in the 1850s, the floodgates of migration burst open.*

When we move, we make assessments of our new neighbors and neighborhood. They, in return, watch us move into their neighborhood, and may ‘size us up’ by our friendliness, possessions, (or lack of possessions), our physical appearance, etc. These assessments, I believe, are instincts designed for our survival, but must be tempered or they can morph into prejudice.

Lord, what were the judgments of these ‘new neighbors’ in Minnesota? Will You forgive us the inheritance of those who knowingly moved into the state illegally? Will You forgive the betrayals committed between settler and tribe, and their counter-betrayals? Will You break the power of the derogatory words and names given among these groups? Will You break the vows made in anger, envy, revenge, arrogance, unforgiveness, fear, and unbelief of each group towards its real or supposed nemesis?

Lord, what were the judgments of these ‘new neighbors’ in Minnesota? Will You forgive us the inheritance of those who knowingly moved into the state illegally? Will You forgive the betrayals committed between settler and tribe, and their counter-betrayals? Will You break the power of the derogatory words and names given among these groups? Will You break the vows made in anger, envy, revenge, arrogance, unforgiveness, fear, and unbelief of each group towards its real or supposed nemesis?

Thinking about the impact of these past separations on the present, will You forgive the heart behind the relocation of Native Americans? Will you free us from the bondages and entanglements within poorly made treaties? Will You bring Your heart of restoration to Minnesota? Will You bring to light a new kind of history in Minnesota? Will You write a history that remembers the good, the pleasing, the fair, the gracious, the restored relationship on our hearts? Will you give us Your eyes to see our neighbors’ inherent value?

*mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm

Standard
19th Century, Culture, History, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota, Native Americans, Treaties

Winnebago Moved to Reservation 1847  

xa-hochun

A treaty with the U.S. government moves the Winnebago (Ho-Chunk) from northeastern Iowa and southeastern Minnesota to a reservation in Todd County. With the Ojibwe to the north and the Dakota to the south, government officials hope the Winnebago reservation will serve as a buffer zone between Minnesota’s two larger Indian nations.

The Winnebago prefer the terrain of the prairie to this wooded area, and in 1855, they relocate to a smaller tract of land in Blue Earth County. They remain there until after the U.S.-Dakota Conflict, when the government forces them to move with the Dakota to the Crow Creek reservation in South Dakota.*

Jesus, thanks for the peoples of Minnesota. Thanks that You made us Your people whether of Winebago, Ojibwe, Dakota, English, German, French, or Swedish descent. It’s wonderful that we are uniquely made, distinct families conveying some reflection of Your light!
Will You illuminate and forgive the bitter root judgments of the US government towards the Winnebago and vice versa? Will You forgive the government’s desire to use this people as a “buffer” between Ojibwe and Dakota, and the implications that they needed help maintaining peace between their peoples? Will You fill hearts and lands with the gift of restoration here in Minnesota, South Dakota, Iowa, and replace the curses from the hearts of all parties in this event?

*www.dipity.com/Minnesota/History/Minnesota-History/

Standard
19th Century, Business, History, Industry, Intercession, Jesus, Minnesota

Stillwater as Lumber Center 1844

local0509-Goodrich-JohnWEB-140x140

Maine lumberman John McKusick forms the Stillwater Lumber Company. Other New Englanders follow, making Stillwater the early center of Minnesota lumbering.*

May I watch this moment in 1844 with You? Can I sit with You on the east bank of the St. Croix bluff and take in the whole valley? I can practically smell the forest, and feel the calming flow of the St. Croix river.
On this day I remember to You the Ojibwe and Dakota nations that shared this land with us. Will You remember their open-handedness? I thank You for all, past present and future, who are blessed by this kindness.

The forests of this valley, and its’ proximity to such a wide river must have been an amazing discovery to lumbermen like McKusick. Huge trees could be harvested, rolled downhill, and floated to the sawmill. What prime real estate for the woodsman?!

May I thank You for Mc Kusick and the utility of these vast stands of timber? May we ponder the needs those woods supplied for that generation? Thank You for the hard, but good work provided through logging in that era.

As with almost any endeavor, with success comes competition. I know too little about the specifics of the competitive nature of these loggers in Stillwater, but relate to them as human who knows what it’s like to protect something valuable. It is easy to over invest in one’s work, to have our nose so close to the grindstone that we can’t see beyond it.

Will You forgive their fears of losing face, of being lesser? Will You forgive their offenses to You and each other through over harvesting, stealing logs, ignoring boundaries? Will You bless those who practiced happy competition, and enjoyed the camaraderie of Your woods?

Last thought, You present us with an odd paradox in our behavior; we often love what we harvest. Who loves the soil more than the farmer? Who loves ducks like their hunters? Who loves the woods like the logger? Who loves words like the writer?

Thank You for whatever it is we harvest now, or our future generations! May we humbly acknowledge You, and our dependence on Your resources. You commanded the Hebrews to not harvest up to the edges of their fields, but leave some behind so the needy would have food. Will You bless us to do this now and always, whatever our field or forest looks like?

Standard
17th Century, Culture, History, Intercession, Minnesota, Native Americans

Ojibwe arrived in Minnesota 1650 to 1700

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

“Boy Chief” ca. 1835 George Catlin. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ojibwe

The Ojibwe Indians, who have been moving westward for generations, reach the land we now call Minnesota. They encounter forest-dwelling Dakota people already here. The Ojibwe have gradually moved west from the region near the mouth of the St. Lawrence River, north of present-day Maine. By 1680, they have divided into three groups; the northern and southwestern groups have traveled west along the shores of Lake Superior. They have been involved in the fur trade for generations and possess guns. Like the Dakota, the Ojibwe are nature-based hunters, fishers, and horticulturalists.*

Lord Jesus, thank You for using Minnesota as a meeting grounds for the Ojibwe and Dakota tribes! What good was in Your heart in this season for these tribes? Again, a migration of peoples from east to west, but this time Native Americans meeting Native Americans. Thank You for the potential released through the gift of new friendships.

I ask for the continuation and refreshment of this alliance begun in 1650 between these two tribes. If there were any bitter seeds planted then, will You kindly uproot them and release Your peace in its place? Will You retake any legal ground the Enemy may hold through this event, and specifically as it affects these tribal lands? Will You send your grace and truth into any contentious areas? May all Dakota and Ojibwe be blessed by You; Exalted Chief of the hunter, the fisherman, and the planter!

*Note – PrayThroughHistory uses the timeline located for several years at the Minnesota Historical Society Web site, at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm .  Currently the timeline seems to be unavailable. I am hopeful that it will be back up in the future, as it was a valuable, user-friendly tool for anyone wishing to explore Minnesota history.

 

Standard
17th Century, Culture, Exploration, History, Intercession, Minnesota, Native Americans

Dakotas meet Europeans

Source: Wikipedia

 CHARLES WILLIAM JEFFREYS IMAGINES RADISSON MEETING AN INDIGENOUS LEADER. ARTSFILE.CA

 

Exploring the West for furs, French explorers Radisson and Groseilliers canoe along the south shore of Lake Superior. They meet the Dakota Indians, whom they call “Buffalo People,” and are probably the first Europeans to reach Minnesota.*

Lord Jesus, thank You for the meeting of Radission and Groseilliers and the Dakota Indians. Was this by chance, or was it orchestrated by You? What wonderful purposes were in Your mind to meld France to the Dakota peoples? What fantastic opportunities do You wrap up in our chance meetings?

I want to acknowledge before You any bitter judgements rooted in this event. I recognize the judgments made stemming from technological “superiority” or “inferiority.” Thank You for our inherent worth as human beings. Release us in the present from any wounds rooted in this meeting. Will You send Your mercy from this event forward, and create  a heart of remorse, repentance, reconciliation, and a new relationship? Will You reverse any curse, and send Your blessing to the inheritors of this event, whether French, Native American, or Minnesotan?

Thank You that every tribe, tongue, and nation of people is equally loved by You.

*Note – PrayThroughHistory uses the timeline located for several years at the Minnesota Historical Society Web site, at this URL: mnhs.org/about/dipity_timeline.htm .  Currently the timeline seems to be unavailable. I am hopeful that it will be back up in the future, as it was a valuable, user-friendly tool for anyone wishing to explore Minnesota history.
Standard